Graywater

Homes to Recycle Water

Droughts have pushed cities, especially in the American Southwest, to strengthen efficiency mandates at every point in the water system. According to a recent Energy Collective article, Lancaster, California was one of the first municipalities to require homes to be not only solar-ready, but have recycle-ready plumbing. Innovative companies have developed systems that recycle the gray water in the home for non-potable uses (e.g., outside irrigation, toilet water, etc.). According to the article, more than 80 percent of the water used in the typical home is not used for drinking, and technology is now available that can recover 2 of every 3 gallons of a home’s gray water. Generally, these types of systems can cut the total amount of water used by a home by about one-third. 


May 17, 2013--Hickenlooper OKs graywater bill (Northern Colorado Business Report)

Gov. John Hickenlooper this week signed into law a bill allowing homeowners and businesses to reuse bathroom sink, shower and other graywater. Rep. Randy Fischer, D-Fort Collins, and Sen. Gail Schwartz, D-Snowmass Village, introduced House Bill 1044. Hickenlooper signed the bill at Colorado State University on Wednesday.


April 16, 2013--Colorado "graywater" measure could reduce water bills (Denver Post)

If House Bill 1044 were a book, it might be called "Fifty Shades of Graywater," a suggestion that made Sen. Gail Schwartz laugh out loud.


Graywater

Colorado is one of the only states in the West that doesn’t allow the domestic use of graywater, but that may soon change. Rep. Randy Fischer (D-Fort Collins) has reintroduced a graywater bill allowing homeowners and businesses to reuse dish-washing, shower, and other graywater. Current Colorado water law allows just one use of water before it goes down the drain, through a wastewater treatment plant, and back into the river for others to use. Lawmakers defeated a similar bill in a 5-4 vote last year, but Fischer thinks it stands a better chance of drawing bipartisan support this year. It is estimated that Colorado could save enough water for 170,000 new suburban families if all new construction included systems to recycle bath and laundry water. Colorado State University Prof. Larry Roesner has been pushing Colorado to expand its graywater use for 10 years. He said graywater makes up 30 percent of household water use. If new homes and businesses all used graywater systems, the state could save 85,000 acre-feet a year, he said.


January 29, 2013--House panel OKs graywater measure (Durango Herald)

Colorado could save enough water for 170,000 new suburban families if all new construction included systems to recycle bath and laundry water, a water expert testified Monday. Colorado is one of the only states in the arid West that doesn’t allow the domestic use of graywater – used water from sinks, washing machines, showers and baths. But that could be about to change.


January 11, 2013--Northern Water to push ‘graywater’ bill (Northern Colorado Business Journal)

The Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District plans to lobby for passage of a bill allowing homeowners and businesses to reuse dish-washing, shower and other graywater. Colorado water law allows just one use of water before it goes down the drain, through a wastewater treatment plant and back into the river for others to use. There are exemptions, however.


April 3, 2009--Graywater study results can't be processed fast enough (L.A.Times)

"It seems we needed to do this study three years ago," said Sybil Sharvelle, principal investigator on a graywater study that’s been in the works since 2006 and won’t be completed until mid-2011.

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