Brazil

July 29, 2016--Where are the world’s most water-stressed cities? (Guardian)

Water stress – where the human or ecological demand for water is not met – is caused by a variety of factors.


April 6, 2015--How on earth are two of the most water-rich nations having H2O crises? (Fortune.com)

Brazil has been called the “Saudi Arabia of water.” The U.S. is home to the largest freshwater lake in the world. Both are having H2O crises. What gives? Between the two nations, Brazil and the U.S. have one fifth of the world’s freshwater reserves, and yet both are facing historic water crises.


February 25, 2015--São Paulo--anatomy of a failing megacity: Residents struggle as water taps run dry (Guardian)

In São Paulo, drinking water is used flush toilets, bathe and, until very recently, to wash cars and even hose down city pavements, as porters use jets of crystalline water to shift those last specks of grime. In Brazil, a land of immense natural riches and home to around 12% of the world’s fresh water, the very idea of a water shortage is hard for people to conceive of.


November 25, 2014--Water war amid Brazil drought leads to fight over puddles (Bloomberg)

Brazil’s Jaguari reservoir has fallen to its lowest level ever, laying bare measurement posts that jut from exposed earth like a line of dominoes. The nation’s two biggest cities are fighting for what little water is left. Sao Paulo state leaders want to tap Jaguari, which feeds Rio de Janeiro’s main source.


November 13, 2014--Two thirds of world's largest companies exposed to serious water risks (The Guardian)

São Paulo is the wealthiest state in Brazil. It is the pulsating heartbeat of the Brazilian economy. The state’s capital of the same name is a major driver of commercial activity. A megacity and home to 20 million people, it was at one point the largest industrial city in the southern hemisphere.


June 20, 2012--Water power rise (Environmental News Network)

Hydropower or water power is power derived from the energy of falling water, which may be harnessed for useful purposes. Since ancient times, hydropower has been used for irrigation and the operation of various mechanical devices, such as watermills, sawmills, textile mills, dock cranes, and domestic lifts since ancient times. It is one of several renewable power sources.


August 25, 2011--Brazilian scientists find signs of 3,700-mile underground river flowing far under Amazon River (Washington Post)

A huge underground river appears to be flowing thousands of feet beneath the Amazon River, Brazilian scientists said Thursday. Valiya Hamza of Brazil’s National Observatory said researchers found indications the subterranean river is 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) long, about the same length as the Amazon on the surface.


Syndicate content