Hickenlooper

***Public Input Sought for Colorado Water Plan!***

As an essential resource, water supports the open space provided by the state’s productive ranches and farms, brings us recreational activities such as boating and fishing, is the source of high quality drinking water for our growing towns and cities, and provides life to the beautiful environment that surrounds us. 


March 28, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan close, but not there yet (Denver Post)

In December, Colorado will issue a comprehensive state water plan. The importance of this endeavor cannot be overstated: If done well, it can measurably improve our use of water and help to strengthen our quality of life and economy. This initiative is unprecedented, daring to go where previous efforts have failed.


February 21, 2015--Ciruli: It's Colorado's move on water planning (Denver Post)

Colorado's statewide water planning is overdue. California and Texas, the nation's two largest states and users of Colorado headwaters, have moved well ahead of the state in planning and investment. Both downstream states are facing major shortages.


February 12, 2015--Colorado water plan can’t create more H20 (Aspen Daily News)

Gov. John Hickenlooper recently received the initial draft of the Colorado Water Plan. This “plan” has been in the making since the drought year of 2002, and it’s not over yet. Work on the plan, including public input, will continue through the coming year, with the final version due to the governor in December 2015. The Colorado Water Plan in many ways is indeed historic.


February 11, 2015--Hickenlooper says state needs to spend big to prepare for growth (Denver Post)

Gov. John Hickenlooper ended his remarks to the Economic Club of Colorado on Tuesday with a warning for the state’s business leaders. A major focus of his second term is preparing for Colorado’s impending growth — with 3 million more residents expected in the next 20 years, he said.


February 8, 2015--Water plan must focus on conservation, not diversion (Post Independent)

Until 50 years ago, dams and water diversions were seen by many as symbols of progress, ingenuity and man’s triumph over nature. By 1970 we had built 100,000 dams in rivers and creeks across the country, and their negative impacts — on fish, wildlife, wetlands, recreation and communities — were becoming increasingly visible.


February 2, 2015--Big game: Aquatic football? (Pueblo Cieftain)

The game plan is in place. The team has been conditioned. It’s been a rough season. The quarterback got beat up a little bit, but seems to be on a winning streak. OK, it’s not football. But that is one way to get a first down as the state marches down the field to score with the Colorado Water Plan.


January 31, 2015--Looking beyond the basin to solve Colorado’s water conundrum (San Juan Independent)

Facing a possible continuation of statewide drought conditions, accelerating water demands on the Front Range and the fear of agricultural dry up, members of the Southwest Basin Roundtable want the State of Colorado to look outside the Colorado River Basin for possible future water sources in its final draft of the Colorado Water Plan.


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