Hickenlooper

***Public Input Sought for Colorado Water Plan!***

As an essential resource, water supports the open space provided by the state’s productive ranches and farms, brings us recreational activities such as boating and fishing, is the source of high quality drinking water for our growing towns and cities, and provides life to the beautiful environment that surrounds us. 


June 19, 2015--State's first-ever water plan in homestretch (Colorado Statesman)

Bring up the topic of Colorado water just about anywhere across the arid state, and before long someone is bound to invoke the state’s unofficial motto, a saying attributed to Mark Twain: Whiskey is for drinking.


June 1, 2015--‘Where’s the beef’ in Colorado’s water plan? (Colorado Independent)

The first draft of Colorado’s new water plan offered plenty of background information about the state’s water, but didn’t say exactly what can be done to avoid a looming water-supply gap. By 2050, the state could be short billions of gallons per year — twice as much as Denver now uses annually.


May 31, 2015--Extra water savings likely addition to State Water Plan (KUNC)

Colorado's water plan will probably include additional conservation measures from cities and industrial users. That's what members of the state's Interbasin Compact Committee agreed to at a meeting May 20. The specifics are still being worked out, but the added conservation could save 400,000 acre-feet of water.


May 14, 2015--Gov. Hickenlooper signs bill to fight invasive, thirsty plants (KVNF)

House Bill 1006 creates the Invasive Phreatophyte Grant Program. Governor John Hickenlooper signed the bill at a ceremony in Montrose on Tuesday. "Phreatophytes are those trees and bushes...like Russian olive or tamarisk that just suck up water," said Hickenlooper.


May 1, 2015--A draft of Colorado’s proposed water plan may not be trickling down to the people? (Colorado Independent)

Water fights run deep in this state, and officials long avoided drafting a plan for what to do about it. But Gov. John Hickenlooper knows avoidance is no longer an option; water is running out. As Colorado’s population rises, the gap between supply and demand is expected to grow to millions of gallons of water per day by 2050.


Brown Named Colorado Agriculture Commissioner

In late January Governor Hickenlooper announced Don Brown will be the new Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture. He replaces John Salazar who retired in December, having served since 2011. “We are fortunate to welcome Don Brown to the team and thrilled to add his experience and leadership to Colorado’s thriving agriculture industry,” said Hickenlooper. “Agriculture is a critical sector for our economy, contributing $40 billion and providing nearly 173,000 jobs annually. Having Don at the helm, we know agriculture across Colorado will continue to grow.” As commissioner, Brown will lead the department’s daily operations, direct its 300 employees, and oversee the agency’s seven divisions. Brown, a third-generation farmer in Yuma County, has run several successful businesses while spending most of his career managing and growing his family’s extensive farm operations. He has also been active in water conservation, energy development, and technology innovation issues within the industry. Brown is a recipient of the Bill Seward Memorial Award--Lifetime Achievement for Outstanding Cattle Producer. He is active in the National Cattlemen’s Association, Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, National Corn Growers, and the Colorado Corn Growers Association. He also served as president of the Yuma County Cattlemen’s Association and state president of the Future Farmers of America. Brown graduated with a degree in agriculture from Northeastern Junior College in Sterling, and received a vocational agriculture education degree with honors from Colorado State University.


March 28, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan close, but not there yet (Denver Post)

In December, Colorado will issue a comprehensive state water plan. The importance of this endeavor cannot be overstated: If done well, it can measurably improve our use of water and help to strengthen our quality of life and economy. This initiative is unprecedented, daring to go where previous efforts have failed.


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