U.S. Geological Survey

April 23, 2015--Federal report finds major increase in earthquake activity in Colorado (Denver Business Journal)

Colorado is among a number of states that the U.S. Department of Interior found has increased seismic activity, according to the U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model report released Wednesday. The report points to the injection of wastewater from oil and gas operations into the ground as being a major cause of the uptick in earthquakes.


April 18, 2015--Climate study foresees fewer year-round streams (Post Independent)

Some year-round streams could become intermittent as global climate change takes a toll on the Upper Colorado River basin, according to a recent study. “Modeled intermittency risk for small streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin under climate change,” written by Lindsay V. Reynolds, Patrick B.


March 18, 2015--Overpumping of Central Valley groundwater creating a crisis, experts say (Los Angeles Times)

A simple instrument with a weight and a pulley confirmed what hydrologist Michelle Sneed had suspected after seeing more and more dirt vanish from the base of her equipment each time she returned to her research site last summer. The tawny San Joaquin Valley earth was sinking a half-inch each month. The reason was no mystery.


February 13, 2015--Return of the Dust Bowl? Climate change study highlights how West must adapt (Christian Science Monitor)

A prolonged period of Dust Bowl-like conditions in the second half of this century could severely test strides made toward conserving scarce water supplies in the Western United States and central Plains, according to a new study.


February 12, 2015--Study: Flooding on the rise in Midwest (USA Today)

The frequency – but not the intensity – of floods in the Upper Midwest has been increasing in recent decades, says a study out this week.


February 7, 2015--AWWA To Congress: Controlling Nntrient pollution key to preventing cyanotoxins in drinking water (Water Online)

In testimony recently before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association Water Utility Council Chair Aurel Arndt stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with better managing nutrient pollution.


January 31, 2015--USGS report shows how global warming will shift Pacific wind and wave patterns (Summit Voice)

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey have developed climate models that help show how global warming will change wind and wave patterns, potentially affecting island communities, especially as sea level rises. The new USGS report looked at U.S. and U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands, including Hawaii, where climate change is expected to alter the highest waves and strongest winds.


Residential Water Use Background Information and Resources

According to Vickers (2001), total residential water use in the US is estimated to average 26,100 million gallons per day (mgd). The U.S. Geological Survey (1998) estimates that residential consumptive use represents 26% of total United States use and that 87% of this is supplied by public water sources.


January 28, 2015--Natural breakdown of petroleum may lace arsenic into groundwater (Environmental News Network)

In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the chemical release (mobilization) of naturally occurring arsenic into groundwater.


January 24, 2015--Report: Farming and urban growth are polluting America’s aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Farming and urban growth, two forces that are reshaping the land surface, are also changing the chemistry and physical properties of the nation’s aquifers, leading to greater concentrations of natural and manmade pollutants that could persist for decades in essential underground water sources, according to a comprehensive U.S.


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