U.S. Geological Survey

February 13, 2015--Return of the Dust Bowl? Climate change study highlights how West must adapt (Christian Science Monitor)

A prolonged period of Dust Bowl-like conditions in the second half of this century could severely test strides made toward conserving scarce water supplies in the Western United States and central Plains, according to a new study.


February 12, 2015--Study: Flooding on the rise in Midwest (USA Today)

The frequency – but not the intensity – of floods in the Upper Midwest has been increasing in recent decades, says a study out this week.


February 7, 2015--AWWA To Congress: Controlling Nntrient pollution key to preventing cyanotoxins in drinking water (Water Online)

In testimony recently before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association Water Utility Council Chair Aurel Arndt stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with better managing nutrient pollution.


January 31, 2015--USGS report shows how global warming will shift Pacific wind and wave patterns (Summit Voice)

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey have developed climate models that help show how global warming will change wind and wave patterns, potentially affecting island communities, especially as sea level rises. The new USGS report looked at U.S. and U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands, including Hawaii, where climate change is expected to alter the highest waves and strongest winds.


Residential Water Use Background Information and Resources

According to Vickers (2001), total residential water use in the US is estimated to average 26,100 million gallons per day (mgd). The U.S. Geological Survey (1998) estimates that residential consumptive use represents 26% of total United States use and that 87% of this is supplied by public water sources.


January 28, 2015--Natural breakdown of petroleum may lace arsenic into groundwater (Environmental News Network)

In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the chemical release (mobilization) of naturally occurring arsenic into groundwater.


January 24, 2015--Report: Farming and urban growth are polluting America’s aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Farming and urban growth, two forces that are reshaping the land surface, are also changing the chemistry and physical properties of the nation’s aquifers, leading to greater concentrations of natural and manmade pollutants that could persist for decades in essential underground water sources, according to a comprehensive U.S.


January 24, 2015--Irrigation water use drops by 30 percent in Nebraska (Journal Star)

Water used to irrigate and grow corn and other agricultural crops dropped by 30 percent across a wide swath of Nebraska last year. And a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey indicates that, on average, the condition of the Ogallala Aquifer is stable and significantly healthier in Nebraska than in all other states over significant portions of the massive freshwater aquifer.


November 16, 2014--Study finds Americans using less water, but Idahoans use the most (Idaho Statesman)

A study by local, state and federal officials tracking everything from collective sips at the public fountain to irrigating crops to water used to cool nuclear power plants has found that water usage has dropped to levels of at least 40 years ago.


November 11, 2014--Factory and irrigation technologies have significantly cut US water use (Popular Science)

In 2010, the U.S. used less water than it has in a generation, according to a new announcement from the U.S. Geological Survey. American power plants, factories, farms, and homes used a total of 355 billion gallons of fresh and salt water a day in 2010. If you divide that amount by the U.S. population in 2010, it comes out to 1,150 gallons per person, per day.


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