U.S. Geological Survey

May 19, 2014--The two sectors that suck up most of our water (Wall Street Journal)

In the U.S., we tend to react to drought by focusing on obvious symbols of water consumption, like golf courses, swimming pools and lush green lawns. If we’re serious about saving water, though, we need to focus on the places where we use the most of it: our food and energy systems. According to the U.S.


April 23, 2014--Mercury in fishes from 21 national parks in the Western United States (USGS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has released a new report on mercury in fish. Here is the abstract: Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant and human activities have increased atmospheric Hg concentrations 3- to 5-fold during the past 150 years.


February 26, 2014--Water declining in western Kansas (Hutchinson News)

Clay Scott is fighting dust. The western Kansas landscape is thirsty. Yet little relief has fallen from the sky. “We’re fighting the drought,” the Grant County farmer said, adding that the little residue he had on his fields is nearly gone.


January 1, 2014--Online water resources tool sheds light on U.S. waterway conditions (Water World)

A new online fact sheet published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides one-stop information on the organization's data sources for waterways across the United States. The database comprises information on the nation's streams, groundwater and water-quality.


December 11, 2013--Government study: Unregulated chemicals seeping into water supply (Water Online)

A new government study says that chemicals are slipping into tap water through water treatment plants across the country. According to the Vancouver Free Press, "Traces of unregulated chemicals were found in drinking water from more than one-third of U.S.


December 4, 2013--California sinking caused by groundwater withdrawal (Water Online)

A California region is sinking quickly due to the amount of groundwater getting pumped out of the area. Extensive pumping from San Joaquin Valley aquifers "is increasing the rate of land subsidence, or sinking," according to a recent report by the U.S.


November 14, 2013--As climate warms American west, iconic trout in jeopardy (NPR)

In the mountain streams of the American West, the trout rules. People don't just catch this fish; they honor it. And spend lots of money pursuing it. But some western trout may be in trouble. Rivers and streams are getting warmer and there's often less water in them.


USGS Report: Health of U.S. Streams Reduced by Streamflow Modifications and Contaminants

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report describes how the health of the nation's streams is being degraded by streamflow modifications and elevated levels of nutrients and pesticides.

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