Natural Resources Conservation Service

Evans Selected USDA’s Colorado NRCS State Conservationist

Clint Evans, Assistant State Conservationist for Operations in Idaho, was recently selected as the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) State Conservationist in Colorado. “It’s an exciting time,” shares Evans.  “I’m looking forward to this opportunity to work with the NRCS employees, conservation partners, landowners and land managers across the state.” Evans started his career with NRCS in 2000, but his first experience with the Agency was in the late 1990s while working on the ranch where his then employer enrolled in the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP).  As a result, Evans gained experience in conservation planning and practice implementation thru financial assistance programs from the customer’s perspective.  He enjoyed working with the NRCS field staff so much that he decided to pursue a career with the Agency. After his tenure as a technician, Evans served in two Kansas field offices, was promoted to District Conservationist in Kingman, Kansas, moved to the Kansas State Office where he served as a Resource Conservationist on the programs staff, and then was selected as Idaho’s Assistant State Conservationist for Programs in 2009. He transferred to serve as Idaho’s Assistant State Conservationist for Operations in 2013. Additionally and in cooperation with his permanent assignments, Evans served on numerous details in other states and Washington, DC. Evans attended Kansas State University where he studied animal science, agri-business, and agronomy earning a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture. 


April 2, 2015--Colorado mountain snowpack low at 69 percent, raising water concerns (Denver Post)

Colorado's mountain snowpack is running low — around 69 percent of average — raising concerns about low streamflow during summer and potential strain on water supplies. A relatively hot, dry March took a toll, melting away snowpack from 87 percent at the end of February.

January 9, 2015--Overall, Colorado’s snowpack is on target (Durango Herald)

As a whole, Colorado’s snowpack was right where it should have been Jan. 1 – standing at 99 percent of the median for the date, the Natural Resources Conservation Service said in a news release.


June 6, 2014--Lake Powell rising a foot every day (Deseret News)

A big snowpack that is being eaten away by high temperatures is causing the water at Lake Powell to rise a foot a day — good news for boaters and other water revelers. "This is a good year to boat at Lake Powell," said Paul Ostapuk, a spokesman for Friends of Lake Powell.

June 5, 2014--Colorado snow pack is nearly double its normal amount, feds say (Denver Post)

Colorado's wet spring and winter are paying big dividends for the state's snow pack and reservoirs in northern parts of the state, but southern areas are still below normal, federal officials said Thursday. The statewide snow pack is almost double that of normal conditions for this time of year — and more than triple in the South Platte basin.


June 5, 2014--Snowpack in Southwest Colorado all but gone (Durango Herald)

The snowpack in the watershed emptied by the Animas, San Juan, Dolores and San Miguel rivers is fading fast, the last report of the year by the Natural Resources Conservation Service shows. The only basin with less snowpack than the four-river watershed as of June 1 was the Upper Rio Grande.


May 24, 2014--USDA provides assistance to agricultural producers to improve water quality (Agri View)

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that $33 million in assistance will be provided to farmers and ranchers to make conservation improvements that will improve water quality in 174 watersheds. The announcement was made on the Secretary's behalf by Deputy Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment Ann Mills during a Hypoxia Task Force meeting, held in Little Rock, Ark.


May 16, 2014--Curious about small hydro? Check this out (Durango Herald)

The Colorado Small Hydro Association is holding a workshop Monday to brief irrigators about new federal and state regulations that make it easier to install water-driven power plants on agricultural canals.  “There’s definitely a potential to add a hydro system,” Sterling Moss, director of the Natural Resources Conservation Service office in Durango.


May 10, 2014--Snowpack suffering in Southwest Colorado (Durango Herald)

The snowpack as of May 1 in the watersheds drained by the Animas, San Juan, Dolores and San Miguel rivers leaves the southwest corner of Colorado hurting. At 68 percent of its 30-year median, the amount of snow in the high country foretells a sparse runoff. Only the Rio Grande basin is worse off at 50 percent.


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