Arsenic

June 7, 2016--USGS map reveals long-term changes in America’s groundwater quality (Circle of Blue)

Chloride and nitrate concentrations are rising and arsenic levels are holding steady or falling. Those are two of the conclusions from a U.S. Geological Survey assessment of changes in the nation’s groundwater quality in the last two decades.


November 13, 2015--Metal sediment unlikely to dissolve (Durango Herald)

Scientists working on heavy metals in the Animas River delivered some good news about the sediment Friday. Metals in the sediment left by the August Gold King Mine breach are likely to wash downstream without dissolving, and this could avoid a more toxic environment for aquatic life, a panel of experts said at Fort Lewis College. The perfect spring weather would bring flows of 6,000 t


July 6, 2015--California’s rural poor hit hardest as groundwater vanishes in long drought (Washington Post)

Whenever her sons rush indoors after playing under the broiling desert sun, Guadalupe Rosales worries. They rarely heed her constant warning: Don’t drink the water. It’s not safe. The 8- and 10-year-olds stick their mouths under a kitchen faucet and gulp anyway. There is arsenic in the groundwater feeding their community well at St.


January 28, 2015--Natural breakdown of petroleum may lace arsenic into groundwater (Environmental News Network)

In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the chemical release (mobilization) of naturally occurring arsenic into groundwater.


November 4, 2014--Inexpensive, easy way to filter arsenic from water (Science Daily)

A University of Florida professor has developed a quick, cheap and easy way to filter from water one of the world's most common pollutants: arsenic. Bin Gao's team used iron-enhanced carbon cooked from hickory chips, called biochar, to remove the toxin. He is an associate professor with the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences' in agricultural and biological engineering.


October 31, 2014--A heart risk in drinking water (New York Times)

Ana Navas-Acien can’t quite recall the moment when she began to worry about arsenic in drinking water and its potential role in heart disease. Perhaps it was when she read a study suggesting a link among people in Bangladesh. And a similar study in Taiwan. And in Chile. Several years ago, Dr.


October 25, 2014--Unsafe drinking water adds to California's drought misery (NBC News)

California is digging deep to get the drinking water it needs after one of the state's worst droughts on record. The problem is that the groundwater it is using is unsafe for nearly 800,000 residents, according to the state's water resources control board, because of longtime contamination from nitrates and arsenic.


April 24, 2013--Court orders EPA to impose power plant water pollution rule (Environmental News Service)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must meet a court-ordered deadline to issue regulations that clean up power plant water pollution, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled today. The decision turns back an attempt by the utility industry to avoid the financial and operational burdens of the regulations.


March 23, 2012--Report: South Platte most polluted in Colorado (Denver Post)

An environmental group says the South Platte River is the most polluted waterway in Colorado. Environment Colorado released a report Thursday based on Environmental Protection Agency statistics from 2010. The group says that industrial facilities released more than 700,000 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado rivers that year, with a third ending up in the South Platte.

December 23, 2011--Historic mercury regs from EPA a boon for health, the environment and jobs (Environmental News Network)

A few small drops of mercury can contaminate a 20-acre lake and the fish that happen to reside there, thanks to coal-fired plant emissions. That’s a major reason why the EPA’s decision to regulate the emissions of mercury, lead and other toxic pollutants from coal- and oil-fired plants is a major victory for the health and environmental welfare of the nation.


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