Water Conflict

July 18, 2015--The California drought is just the beginning of our national water emergency (Nation)

The United Nations reports that we have 15 years to avert a full-blown water crisis and that, by 2030, demand for water will outstrip supply by 40 percent.


History of Water Conflicts

The Pacific Institute has created a 5,000-year timeline (http://www2.worldwater.org/conflict/index.html) of water conflicts that shows that water politics have been messy since the beginning. The timeline goes as far back as 3,000 BC and includes such examples as poisoning enemy wells, targeting and destroying hydroelectric dams, bombing of irrigation canals, and riots sparked by insufficient water supplies. The Pacific Institute indicated that “the problems are expected to continue.” By 2025, scientists predict that one in five humans will live in regions suffering from water scarcity and many analysts have predicted that pressure on water resources could spark wars in the coming years. Moreover, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world has not woken up to the water crisis caused by climate change. The latest report from the United Nations IPCC predicted a rise in global temperature of between .5 to 8.6 Fahrenheit by the late 21st century. More extreme weather such as droughts will lead to serious water shortages and affect agricultural output and food security. Development experts around the world have become increasingly concerned about water security in recent years. More frequent floods and droughts caused by climate change, pollution of rivers and lakes, urbanization, over-extraction of ground water, and expanding populations mean that many nations will face serious water shortages.


January 17, 2015--A brief history of water conflict (Water Online)

As nations face problems ranging from pollution to scarcity, the politics of water resources have become complicated—but that is nothing new. The Pacific Institute, a think tank, has created a 5,000-year timeline of water conflicts, including religious accounts. It shows that water politics have been messy since the beginning.


January 14, 2015--Now is the time for national water resource policy (Huff Post)

Water is our most precious natural resource and, yet, we abuse it and fail to effectively manage it. The Center for Neighborhood Technology, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago that focuses on sustainable cities, estimates that the loss of water from our municipal distribution systems approaches 2.1 trillion gallons per year.


October 6, 2014--War and water (Huff Post)

The tide of war and peace often turns on water, as is the case with the conflict in Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). These countries lack water security, which is a condition where individuals and nations have access to an adequate quantity and quality of water with acceptable costs and risks.


July 7, 2014--In Mexico, water fight underscores distrust of government (Los Angeles Times)

For the first time in modern Mexican history, an armed civilian band has ejected a drug cartel from its environs. But the vigilantes have also proved a challenge to the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto -- making clear that official security forces had been unable to do their jobs.


June 20, 2014--Water war bubbling up between California and Arizona (Los Angeles Times)

Once upon a time, California and Arizona went to war over water. The year was 1934, and Arizona was convinced that the construction of Parker Dam on the lower Colorado River was merely a plot to enable California to steal its water rights.


October 4, 2009--Drought disaster looms in east Africa (Environmental News Network)

Across the north of Kenya competition for water, grazing land and surviving cattle has sparked ethnic conflict. Cattle raids were always a feature of nomadic cultures but as the battle for survival intensifies the death toll climbs. Sixty-five people have been killed in the Turkana region alone since January.


October 31, 2007--Oklahoma may appeal ruling allowing water lawsuit to go forward (Denver Post)

U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton said the state's reasons for seeking dismissal of the lawsuit by the Tarrant Regional Water District are "unpersuasive." Oklahoma Attorney General Drew Edmondson said the state can either appeal Heaton's ruling or prepare for trial. "My hunch is that we'll appeal," Edmondson said.


Syndicate content