Levees

February 16, 2014--Report describes the unfathomable cost of inaction on rising seas (InsideClimate News)

The world needs to invest tens of billions of dollars a year in beefing up shoreline defenses against rising oceans or it will face mind-boggling costs in the decades to come, according to new research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


May 8, 2013--Water infrastructure bill heading to senate floor (Water World)

The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2013 (S. 601) is expected to hit the U.S. Senate floor this week. Despite breezing through committee by a unanimous vote, the legislation may face opposition by lawmakers who do not understand the value of water infrastructure investment and those wishing to tack on non-germane amendments.


U.S. Dams

Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates or levees (also known as dikes) are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions. The average age of the 84,000 dams in the U.S. is 52 years old. The nation’s dams are aging and the number of high-hazard dams is on the rise. Many of these dams were built as low-hazard dams protecting undeveloped agricultural land. Both are in sad shape and rated a D for dams and a D- for levees by the American Society of Civil Engineers who are the engineers who build them. If they go, homes and vast stretches of land will be flooded and the environment literally drenched.


March 22, 2013--Dams and levees (Environmental News Network)

Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates or levees (also known as dikes) are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions. The average age of the 84,000 dams in the US is 52 years old. The nation’s dams are aging and the number of high-hazard dams is on the rise.


September 10, 2010--FEMA: Hundreds of levees no longer reliable (USA Today)

The government has determined that hundreds of levees nationwide no longer meet its standards that ensure protection during major floods, a decision that forces thousands of property owners to buy federal flood insurance.


January 29, 2010--OMB cuts Army Corps funding by 12% in draft 2011 budget (New York Times)

The Army Corps of Engineers would face a 12 percent funding cut next year under a draft budget request from the Obama administration. According to the Office of Management and Budget "passback," shared with top Army Corps officials in early December and recently obtained by E&E, the White House will propose $4.81 billion for the agency in the fiscal 2011 budget.


November 20, 2009--Effects of judge's Katrina ruling could be huge (Los Angeles Times)

The harshly worded legal ruling that held the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers responsible for much of the flooding during Hurricane Katrina could have a far-reaching effect on national flood-control policies and on the federal government's long-standing refusal to take responsibility for its errors. U.S. District Judge Stanwood R. Duval Jr.


February 9, 2009--Corps may have squeezed a lemon levee in Alamosa (Alamosa Valley Courier)

The Army Corps of Engineers that constructed a new river levee system through Alamosa a decade ago is now telling the City of Alamosa the levee may be flawed - and the city might have to pay to fix it.

January 28, 2009--Engineers: America's basic physical backbone-roads, water & sewage systems-rate 'D' grades (L.A. Times)

America's roads, public transit and aviation have gotten worse in the past four years. Water and sewage systems are dreadful.

May 11, 2008--Army Corps says condition of many levees a mystery (New York Times)

Across America, earthen flood levees protect big cities and small towns, wealthy suburbs and rich farmland. But the Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency that oversees levees, lacks an inventory of thousands of them and has no idea of their condition, the corps' chief levee expert told The Associated Press.


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