National Weather Service

July 16, 2015--Colorado virtually drought-free after several thirsty years, report shows (Denver Post)

A federal drought report released Thursday shows Colorado is nearly free of the thirst that has affected the state — particularly the Western Slope and southeastern counties — for years. Only about 2 percent of the state, limited to the extreme northwest and southwest corners, is still under a designation of "abnormally dry." Last week, 25 percent of Colorad


June 11, 2015--Flood warning issued for Durango (Durango Herald)

An isolated storm delivered a mixture of rain, hail and lighting shortly after noon on Thursday, briefly knocking out power in some places and contributing to the swell of the Animas River. A flash-flood warning was issued for the Durango area until 3:30 p.m.


January 30, 2015--Unusually high temperatures, low snow pack could spell trouble for Utah’s water needs (Fox 13)

Five degrees for six months: Those are numbers that cause serious concern for Utah water experts. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist for the National Weather Service, said from August through January, northern Utah has averaged temperatures five degrees higher than normal. “Which is incredibly significant when you talk about snow pack,” McInerney said.


December 9, 2014--Warm temps, El Niño pattern make ski resorts anxious (Glenwood Post Independent)

El Niño-influenced weather patterns that have brought much-needed rains to drought-stricken Southern California have also left Colorado ski resorts high and dry heading into the critical holiday season after a spate of early snowstorms allowed many ski areas to open ahead of schedule.


September 30, 2014--Dogged rainfall soaks region (Durango Herald)

It seemed like there was a plumbing problem in the skies above La Plata County on Sunday and Monday, as storms wrung lightning, hail and reams of rain from the clouds in terrific, gloomy, spurting volumes. Snow, rain and icy conditions at Wolf Creek Pass felled one truck Monday, causing the pass to close.


July 28, 2014--U.S. coastal flooding on the rise, government study finds (Reuters)

Flooding is increasing in frequency along much of the U.S. coast, and the rate of increase is accelerating along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts, a team of federal government scientists found in a study released Monday. The study examined how often 45 tide gauges along the country’s shore exceeded National Weather Service flood thresholds across several decades.


July 16, 2014--Grasshopper plagues: agricultural nightmare or ecological boon? (High Country News)

In early June, meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were puzzled: There was a big splotch on the radar that didn’t look like any weather system they’d ever seen. Maybe their software had a bug? Turns out, the dark green blob hovering over Albuquerque wasn’t a software glitch at all but a giant swarm of grasshoppers.


June 6, 2014--Lake Powell rising a foot every day (Deseret News)

A big snowpack that is being eaten away by high temperatures is causing the water at Lake Powell to rise a foot a day — good news for boaters and other water revelers. "This is a good year to boat at Lake Powell," said Paul Ostapuk, a spokesman for Friends of Lake Powell.

May 23, 2014--Dust bowl days: Will we cut carbon pollution fast enough to prevent permanent droughts? (Climate Progress)

Large parts of the Southwest are drier than they were during the 1930s Dust Bowl. And the latest science says unrestricted carbon pollution will make this a near-permanent situation post-2050 in a growing portion of this country and around the world — for a thousand years or more! Earlier this month, the U.S.


January 25, 2014--Early trends point to El Nino cycle (Montrose Daily Press)

Although it’s early to think about weather patterns toward the end of the year, models and trends show that Colorado could be headed for a southernly winter storm system. “We are still neutral in the cycle. The models are hinting at going toward an El Nino cycle next fall,” the National Weather Service’s Aldis Strautins said.


Syndicate content