Instream Flow Program

April 2, 2016--Lawsuit filed on Dolores River standard (Durango Herald)

The Southwestern Water Conservancy District has filed a legal challenge in water court against a new minimum flow requirement for the Lower Dolores River established by the state last year. In September, the Colorado Water Conservation Board agreed to establish minimum in-stream flows up to 900 cubic feet per second in spring on the Dolores River between the confluence of the San Miguel Ri


September 27, 2015--A critical step in protecting the West’s waterways (Grand Junction Sentinel)

The massive and tragic spill of mine wastewater into the Animas River is a stark reminder of the impacts energy and mineral development can have on our waterways.  While we have come a long way since the mining rush of the 19th century, energy and mineral development continues throughout Colorado and the West.  Development must be done responsibly especially when it comes to our preci


September 25, 2015--Keeping water in the Dolores (Telluride Watch)

The Colorado Water Conservation Board unanimously decided last week to seek an in-stream flow right on a stretch of the Dolores River. Advocates say the move, which will secure up to 900 cubic feet per second for the reach from the Dolores River’s confluence with the San Miguel River to a mile above Gateway, will protect the river and three sensitive species of fish that live there.&


September 21, 2015--State agrees to improve flows on Lower Dolores (Durango Herald)

Colorado’s top water board agreed Tuesday to improve flows on the Lower Dolores River to boost the health of the river and its native fish. The Colorado Water Conservation Board will seek an in-stream flow right of up to 900 cubic feet per second on the Lower Dolores below its confluence with the San Miguel River. In-stream flows are designated by the board to preserve an


Landmark Legal Decision Protects Instream Flows

In April the Colorado Supreme Court rendered a landmark decision upholding the instream water right for the San Miguel River in Southwest Colorado. The court deemed that a senior water rights holder, Farmers Water Development Company, is unaffected by the State of Colorado’s instream water rights on the San Miguel river and affirms that state water rights are a legitimate and essential tool to protect Colorado’s fish and wildlife.


May 4, 2015--Colorado Water: State agency into buying water to leave in rivers (Aspen Times)

Just one state agency has a mission that includes paying people to leave water in Colorado’s rivers for environmental reasons — and that can legally protect the flowing water — and that’s the Colorado Water Conservation Board, or CWCB.


March 11, 2015--CWCB proposed acquisition of contractual interest in water on the 15 mile reach of the Colorado River (CWCB Instream Flow Program)

At its March 18-19, 2015 meeting in Broomfield, CO, the Colorado Water Conservation Board (“CWCB”) will evaluate a proposal from the Ute Water Conservancy District for a potential lease of a contractual interest in water for instream flow use to preserve/improve the natural environment to a reasonable degree in the Colorado River. The reach of stream proposed for use


July 12, 2014--West-Slope Colorado towns restore local flows, even as thirsty front-range lawns drink from their rivers (National Geographic)

When residents in Denver, Colorado Springs and other cities on the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains turn on their sprinklers to irrigate lawns, they rarely think about the fate of fish in the headwaters of the Colorado River on the other side of the Continental Divide.


May 9, 2014--Potential for harm: Opponents of Senate Bill 23 express concern about upstream water users (Steamboat Today)

Senate Bill 23, which recently passed the Colorado Legislature, aims to provide incentives for agricultural water users and irrigators on the Western Slope to make their operations more efficient, but some opposed the bill on the grounds that it has the potential to harm others’ water rights.


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