Desalination

October 5, 2016--Floating new ideas for water solutions--Part 2 (Arizona State University)

To reach the floating docks at Temple Bar Marina on Lake Mead, you have to cross a 200-yard-long gangway stretching across cracked mud flats that used to be the lake bottom. Mike Reisbig moored his boat there on an August afternoon.


January 31, 2016--Obama administration aims to reduce US water footprint (Desert Sun)

The Obama administration has begun an initiative aimed at making the United States more water-efficient, saying the country has the potential to reduce its total water use by a third. Deputy Interior Secretary Mike Connor said some of the White House’s objectives include encouraging more recycling of wastewater and promoting investment in water treatment and desal


The Colorado River Desalination Plant

According to a High Country News article, the Paradox Valley in western Colorado was formed millions of years ago, when a huge dome of salt collapsed. Now, that salt remains and the waters of the Dolores River pick it up and carry it to the Colorado River, where it eventually degrades the water quality for downstream users. For nearly 50 years the Paradox Valley Unit, which is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, has been treating the salt problem. According to the article, the unit treats nearly 200 gallons of brine every minute—this is seven times saltier than ocean water. The brine is then injected into a formation about 2.5 miles beneath the Earth’s surface. The formation, however, will eventually fill up rendering the unit useless. According to the HCN article, there are no obvious replacement options, and officials do not know how long they have left, but estimate 10 to 20 years. 


October 12, 2015--The Colorado River’s desalination plant is on its last legs (High Country News)

The Paradox Valley in western Colorado got its name because the Dolores River bisects it, rather than running through it in the normal topographical fashion. The landscape is short on people, long on sagebrush and probably best known for the dramatic red cliffs that loom over travelers making the long drive from Telluride, Colorado, to Moab, Utah.


April 20, 2015--'One water' can solve many supply problems (Green Biz)

Why do we make a water shortage worse by carving it into separate problems? Current events in California are drawing attention to the current and projected gap between water supply and demand projections.

March 14, 2015--Could Canada help the U.S. solve the American water crisis? (MainStreet)

While President Obama vetoed the Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline with great fanfare, Canadian politicians and agencies have for decades more quietly blocked water pipeline and diversion schemes. Pressure on Canada could grow as the U.S.


January 27, 2015--California water shortage: $1 billion plant will make seawater drinkable by end of 2015 (Los Angeles Times)

While much of California remains in the grip of a three-year drought, a $1 billion desalination plant that will turn seawater to drinking water is on track to open later this year to serve residents of San Diego County. Once running, the plant will be the largest of its kind in the Western Hemisphere.


December 22, 2014--Research finds potable reuse is the most affordable source of new water (Water and Wastes Digest)

Prolonged and severe droughts and other factors have made water supplies increasingly scarce in California, Texas and many other regions of the U.S., as well as elsewhere around the globe. A viable and affordable solution for many communities is to turn their wastewater into purified drinking water, according to a new WateReuse Research Foundation white paper.


December 16, 2014--Desalination out of desperation (MIT Technology Review)

Even in drought-stricken California, San Diego stands out. It gets less rain than parched Los Angeles or Fresno. The region has less groundwater than many other parts of the state. And more than 80 percent of water for homes and businesses is imported from sources that are increasingly stressed.


November 20, 2014--Recycled water facility in Australia offers lessons for global drought planning (Circle of Blue)

The blueprint for meeting Australia’s future water demand is taking physical shape in Craigie, a northern suburb of Perth, the largest city in Western Australia.


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