Efficiency

July 24, 2014--Water officials mull how to enforce penalty: Utilities, district consider implementing $500 fines for outdoor waste (San Mateo Daily Journal)

In the face of grim conservation rates during one of the worst droughts in history, local water districts are working to determine how to crack down on those who waste water outdoors after state regulators approved fines of up to $500 a day.


July 13, 2014--Another view: Busting water conservation myths (Sacramento Bee)

As a solution for California’s complex water challenges, conserving water to get more from every drop stands out for its great potential and the misconceptions around it.


July 5, 2014--Pay heed to water use in climate change mitigation: Experts (Climate Change Journal)

Besides cutting greenhouse gas emissions, technology, policies or plans that aim to slow down climate change should also take environmental factors such as water usage into account, say researchers. A more integrated approach might make some options considerably more attractive than others, said Philip Wallis from Monash University in Australia.


California Could Save Up to 14 Million Acre-Feet of Water

According to a new analysis released by the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council, California could be saving up to 14 million acre-feet of untapped water--providing more than the amount of water used in all of California’s cities in one year--with an aggressive statewide effort to use water-saving practices, reuse water, and capture lost stormwater. “Our current approach to water use is unsustainable, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t enough water to meet our needs,” said Kate Poole, NRDC senior attorney with the water program. “At a time when every drop counts, we need to employ sensible and cost-effective 21st century solutions that will help us reduce uses today while promising new, resilient supplies for cities and farms tomorrow.” “As climate change brings more extreme weather, including droughts, ramping up forward-thinking solutions now will help us be more resilient,” said Peter Gleick (pictured right), president of the Pacific Institute.


Senate Bill 23

On June 5th, Governor Hickenlooper vetoed Senate Bill 23, an agricultural water conservation bill crafted over the course of a year in close partnership with many water interests, including the Governor’s own water policy experts. The bill was designed to incentivize the implementation of irrigation efficiency improvements that would ultimately benefit agricultural operations and Colorado’s rivers and streams. Interestingly, the bill would have only affected West Slope irrigators. Under the bill’s provisions, ranchers, farmers and other agricultural water users could voluntarily implement irrigation and water efficiency measures and ensure that water they save would benefit Colorado’s rivers without risking abandonment of their water rights or harming other users. The result would have been increased private investment in upgrades to and modernization of irrigation infrastructure, healthier rivers and streams, and more resilient farms and ranches. SB 23 had support from many rural Coloradans, major water providers, Colorado’s leading conservation organizations, and Colorado Water Congress, the state’s leading voice for water policy.


June 18, 2014--Colorado's water plan is being hijacked (Denver Post)

Last year, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper wrote an executive order requiring the state to create an official Colorado water plan that would lay out how the state should manage water for the next 30 years. Unfortunately, that plan is being hijacked by dam and pipeline builders who want to dam, drain, dry up, and destroy our Colorado rivers.


June 18, 2014--Bad water policies (Aguanomics)

Here -- for your future reference -- are a few popular policies and their drawbacks: A national water strategy is usually inappropriate because it's at the wrong governance scale. The largest useful scale for governance is a watershed or catchment, which may cross national or political boundaries.


June 15, 2014--Water woes forcing big beer brewers to tighten tap (Associated Press)

Some of the largest brewers in the U.S. are trying to reduce their water-to-beer ratio as drought and wildfire threaten the watersheds where they draw billions of gallons every year. No independent group tracks beermakers' water usage, but MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch both say they have made reductions.


June 13, 2014--Drought-stricken California could save up to 14 million acre-feet of water; enough to supply all the state's cities annually (Pacific Institute)

California could be saving up to 14 million acre-feet of untapped water – providing more than the amount of water used in all of California’s cities in one year – with an aggressive statewide effort to use water-saving practices, reuse water, and capture lost stormwater, according to a new analysis released today by the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Counc


June 13, 2014--Brown is the new green at U.S. Open: Water is ‘biggest obstacle’ facing golf, says USGA (Think Progress)

If you tune into the U.S. Open golf championship this Father’s Day weekend, you may think you’re watching the Dubai Desert Classic or the infamous “Brown British Open.” But the U.S. Golf Association wants you to know that what you’re really seeing at Pinehurst #2 in North Carolina is the future of golf.


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