Pacific Ocean

September 19, 2016--Think California’s current drought is bad? Past incarnations have lasted hundreds of years (Washington Post)

California is now five years deep into one of its most severe droughts on record, and scientists are continually probing the different factors that affect the state’s climate, and how much those are related to the overall warming of the globe.


April 21, 2016--Who's to blame for faulty local El Niño predictions? (Los Angeles Times)

A rainy season that began with much El Niño-fueled promise is speeding to a dry and disappointing end.


April 19, 2016--Ocean souring on climate change (San Diego Union-Tribute)

The West Coast’s famously abundant fisheries are at risk as the region’s waters become more acidic, a group of scientists have warned. The researchers, with the West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Science Panel, this month released a report that projects dire changes to ocean chemistry and marine life, and recommends ways to avert it, including restoring kelp forests and


January 5, 2016--El Niño effect: California braces for two weeks of rain and snow (Associated Press)

After all the talk, El Niño storms have finally lined up over the Pacific and started soaking drought-parched California with rain expected to last for most of the next two weeks, forecasters said Monday. As much as 15 inches of rain could fall in the next 16 days in Northern California, with about 2 feet of snow expected in the highest points of the Sierra Nevada, said Johnny Powel


October 19, 2015--El Niño likely to break state drought (Cortez Journal)

The Four Corners is still trending toward a wetter, cooler winter thanks to a strong El Niño, reports the National Weather Service in Grand Junction. The 2015-16 winter forecast from December to February shows a 33 to 40 percent chance that the Four Corners will be wetter than normal.


September 23, 2015--Here comes the sea: The struggle to keep the ocean out of California’s coastal aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Driving on the world-famous Route 1, just south of town, a traveler looking west across fields of strawberries can see the great silvery expanse of the Pacific Ocean. The land is heavy with a harvest that will soon be trucked to grocery stores and fruit stands throughout the United States. The Pacific, in the late afternoon sun, dazzles like camera flashes. But the ocean also is stealthy.


May 15, 2015--El Niño near-certain to last through summer: U.S. climate center (Reuters)

The El Niño climate phenomenon is almost certain to last through the Northern Hemisphere summer, the U.S. weather forecaster said, raising the chance of heavy rain in the southern United States as well as South America, and scorching heat in Asia that could devastate crops of thirsty food staples like rice.


What Creek Connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans?

The Panama Canal is not the only water line connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. There's a place in Wyoming—deep in the Teton Wilderness Area of the Bridger-Teton National Forest—in which a creek splits in two. Like the canal, this creek connects the two oceans dividing North America in two parts. Yes. You read that right: North America is divided in two parts by a single water line that—no matter how hard you try not to—you will have to cross to go from North to South and vice versa. The creek divides into two similar flows at a place called the Parting of the Waters. To the East, the creek flows 3,488 miles to the Atlantic Ocean via Atlantic Creek and the Yellowstone, Missouri, and Mississippi Rivers. To the West, it flows 1,353 miles to the Pacific Ocean via Pacific Creek and the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Of course, unlike the Panama Channel, you can't navigate these waters—unless you are a fish. At Parting of the Waters, water actually covers the Continental Divide such that a fish could safely swim from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean drainages. In fact, it is thought that this was the pass that provided the immigration route for Cutthroat Trout to migrate from the Snake River (Pacific) to Yellowstone River (Atlantic) drainages.


March 12, 2015--Could China & India's air pollution be behind our cold, snowy winters? (Environmental News Network)

Many scientists think that climate change might be one cause of this year's "snowpocalypse" in Boston and bitter cold snaps in New York and Washington. But physicists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have been looking into another culprit: air pollution in China and India. "Over the past 30 years or so, man-made emission centers have shifted from tr


March 1, 2015--Fukushima nuclear radiation spikes 7,000% as contaminated water pours into the ocean (Global Research)

Cleanup crews trying to mitigate Japan’s never-ending radiation crisis at Fukushima ran into more problems recently after sensors monitoring a drainage gutter detected a huge spike in radiation levels from wastewater pouring into the Pacific Ocean.


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