Invasive Species

STOP AQUATIC HITCHHIKERS!

The Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers! campaign is designed to address the multiple challenges of an environmental issue known collectively as aquatic nuisance species. Invasive species represent one of the greatest threats to quality fisheries.


March 1, 2015--McPhee Reservoir at risk of mussel invasion (Associated Press)

The non-native quagga and zebra mussels are wreaking havoc on reservoirs in California, Arizona, and Nevada, clogging reservoirs and substantially increasing maintenance costs. Larvae can survive in water on boats that then infect other lakes. Annual tests show McPhee has tested negative so far for the mussels. According to the Cortez Journal, concerns rose after the U.S.


February 7, 2015--Aerial survey shows pine beetles waning, but spruce beetles continue to spread across Colorado forests (Summit Voice)

There’s good news and bad news from Colorado’s forests. Mountain pine beetle activity has faded to the lowest level since 1996, but spruce beetles continue to spread in the San Juans and in northwestern Colorado. The spruce beetle outbreak was detected on 485,000 acres in 2014, compared to 398,000 acres across the state in 2013, according to the U.S.


February 1, 2015--California drought creating serious water-weed problems (Seattle Times)

Over the past several months, a thick carpet of green has spread across many Delta harbors and even open channels, making them the latest victims of California’s drought.


January 20, 2015--Not a water cure-all, but definitely the right steps (Arizona Central)

Water conservation in an age of drought can take a lot of forms, one of which is returning watersheds and forests to a more traditionally natural condition — a condition that sucks up a lot less water. That is part of the thinking behind conservation projects proposed to repair habitat along the Verde and Colorado rivers, which should improve the flow of water in the Colorado


January 14, 2015--McPhee at risk for invasive species (Dolores Star)

Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the U.S. Forest Service, the Dolores Water Conservancy District, and local municipalities all have a common enemy - the invasive zebra and quagga mussel species.


May 29, 2014--Coalition makes ground on war with tamarisk (Cortez Journal)

A coalition of land managers, ecologists, and young adults have been slowly eradicating invasive plant species on the Lower Dolores River the last five years. On the frontlines is the Dolores River Restoration Partnership, formed in 2009 to restore native habitat on 175 miles of the river - from McPhee Dam to the confluence of the Colorado River.


May 25, 2014--Can US eliminate invasive species by eating them? (Washington Post)

 It seems like a simple proposition: American lakes, rivers and offshore waters are filling up with destructive fish and crustaceans originally from other parts of the world, many of them potential sources of food. So why not control these invasive populations by getting people to eat them?


April 22, 2014--McPhee boat check could lose funding (Cortez Journal)

The invasive quagga and zebra mussels have not been detected in McPhee Reservoir, but they’re causing havoc in nearby Lake Powell. Boat inspections at McPhee have been effective in keeping the pests out of local waters so far. However, with shrinking budgets for Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Services, the critical checkpoints have an uncertain future.


Syndicate content