Transmountain Diversions

August 14, 2016--Study: Drought like 2000-2006 would empty Lake Powell (Aspen Daily News)

From his office along the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, Eric Kuhn can see the bottom of Lake Powell. Kuhn, the general manager of the Colorado River District, has been working for months on a study asking if future droughts will drop water levels in Lake Powell so low that Glen Canyon Dam won’t be able to produce hydropower or release enough water to meet downstream demands.&nb


March 8, 2016--West Slope lawmakers push for more storage of water on East Slope (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A Western Slope lawmaker wants to help folks on the eastern side of the state store more water. Doing so not only would help serve the growing water demands of thirsty Front Range cities, but also take pressure off other areas of the state from transmountain diversions, said Rep. J. Paul Brown, R-Ignacio. Brown, along with Sen.


February 17, 2016--South Platte roundtable wants in on West Slope water study (Aspen Daily Times)

An official body representing South Platte River water users wants a say in a pending study of how much more can be diverted from Western Slope rivers before Lake Powell drops to a level that stops the turbines in Glen Canyon Dam and makes it harder to meet downstream flow obligations. “Since we’re involved with the Colorado-Big Thompson project, the largest transmountain diver


February 16, 2016--Water managers want to talk about basin diversions (Aspen Daily News)

Two members of a committee dedicated to the “equitable division of the state’s waters” from the Arkansas basin want to talk about moving more water from Western Slope rivers to thirsty towns and farms east of the Continental Divide. “I think the discussion needs to be pushed,” said Jeris Danielson, who is director of the Purgatoire River Water Conservancy Dist


December 10, 2015--West Slope officials reviewing water plan (Business Times)

Although Western Colorado officials are still reviewing a new statewide water plan, they’ve already raised concerns about transmountain diversions and called for a broader approach to development. Moreover, any legislative action on the plan during the upcoming session could be premature. “We need a chance for legislators to digest this,” said John McClow, a represen


December 6, 2015--Conservation? Yes Dam storage? No (Pueblo Chieftain)

Gov. John Hickenlooper recently unveiled Colorado’s first-ever state water plan. After nearly two years of meetings and input, the ballyhoo of releasing the plan was heard from Yuma to Grand Junction. There’s good and bad in the plan, and the on-the-ground result depends on which part of the plan the state decides to implement.


December 3, 2015--State releases final version of Colorado Water Plan (Pine River Times)

Colorado now has a plan for its water supply future, motivated by the prediction of state population doubling to around 10 million people by 2050. The plan was released on Nov. 19. It contains well over 400 pages. It was initiated in May 2013 by an executive order from Gov. John Hickenlooper.


November 28, 2015--‘Colorado’s Conceptual Framework’ included in water plan (Aspen Journal)

A way to look at any new transmountain diversions in Colorado has been dubbed “Colorado’s Conceptual Framework” in the Colorado Water Plan after previously being called “the seven points” and the “draft conceptual agreement” as it has evolved over the past two years. It’s a lofty title for a framework that major water providers on t


November 21, 2015--Boiling down the Colorado Water Plan’s action plan (Aspen Journal)

There are 16 pages in the Colorado Water Plan devoted to the “Critical Action Plan.” With the action plan's language lightly rinsed and boiled down, a recipe of potential solutions emerges. See below:


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