Water Contamination

EPA Study Confirms Fracking Affects Drinking Water

In June the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that fracking does pollute drinking water, with the release of the draft final version of its study of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas and Its Potential Impact on Drinking Water Resources.


June 29, 2015--EPA to plug Silverton mine soon (Durango Herald)

Mine remediation and greater monitoring above Silverton this summer will help ease the level of poisonous metals in the Animas River, at least at first. At the Red and Bonita Mine, where polluted water is pouring out at 500 gallons per minute, Environmental Protection Agency workers would like to put a stop to the flow by September, said Steven Way, on-scene coordinator for the agency.&nbs


June 18, 2015--Laudato Si' and Water: The Vatican's Encyclical Letter and Global Water Challenges (Huffington Post)

The official text of the much-anticipated Vatican's Encyclical Letter, "Laudato Si'" ("On Care for our Common Home") was released today.


June 8, 2015--How aging water supply systems can be making us sick (Environmental News Network)

A study by engineers at the University of Sheffield is the first to prove conclusively that contaminants can enter pipes through leaks and be transported through the pipe network. The pressure in mains water pipes usually forces water out through leaks, preventing anything else from getting in.


June 5, 2015--Study confirms: Fracking affects drinking water (Pagosa Daily Post)

In a watershed moment, today EPA announced fracking does pollute drinking water — with the release of the draft final version of its study of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas and Its Potential Impact on Drinking Water Resources. Congress commissioned the study in 2010 in response to increasing public questions about the risks posed to drinking water by the unconventional oil


May 9, 2015--Global water quality on brink of disaster (Water Online)

Global water quality is expected to take a plunge in the coming years, according to a new white paper by Veolia and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). "This assessment reveals that levels of BOD, N, and P discharged into water bodies around the world are already alarmingly high, particularly in Asia.


April 24, 2015--The Grand Canyon's lost battle paves way for uranium mining (Men's Journal)

On April 7, a U.S. federal judge in Arizona denied a request to halt new uranium mining at a private site six miles from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. The decision came on the exact day the national non-profit American Rivers named the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon the "Most Endangered River" of 2015.


March 6, 2015--Colorado bill would ban microbeads in personal care products (7 News)

A bill to ban tiny plastic particles that are often included in soaps and cosmetic products passed another hurdle in the state legislature this week. The bill to ban the microbeads by 2020 won preliminary approval in the House and faces a final vote before heading to the Senate. In May 2014, the CALL7 Investigators were first to expose concerns over microbeads in Colorado wa


March 1, 2015--Fukushima nuclear radiation spikes 7,000% as contaminated water pours into the ocean (Global Research)

Cleanup crews trying to mitigate Japan’s never-ending radiation crisis at Fukushima ran into more problems recently after sensors monitoring a drainage gutter detected a huge spike in radiation levels from wastewater pouring into the Pacific Ocean.


February 28, 2015--First global pesticide runoff map shows streams at risk (Environmental News Network)

The application of insecticides poisons streams in roughly 40 percent of the global land surface, new research reveals. Streams in the United States, the Mediterranean, Central America and Southeast Asia are most at risk.


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