Water Law

***Registration is Now Open for 9th Annual Water 101 Seminar (Bayfield, CO)!***

Registration is now open for 9th Annual Water 101 Seminar to be conducted at the Bayfield (CO) Town Library (395 Bayfield Center Drive). Topics include Colorado water law, history, administration, and development. Qualifies for continuing education credits for lawyers and realtors, training units for water utility operators, and teacher certificate renewal hours!


Helping Good Samaritans Clean Up Abandoned Hardrock Mines

For years Colorado legislatures have been trying to pass laws that would make it easier for groups to clean up toxic pollution from abandoned mines. These groups, which are not responsible for the pollution but want to clean it up anyway, are called, appropriately enough, Good Samaritans.


9th Annual Water 101 Seminar (Bayfield, CO)

09/25/2015 8:30 am

After five years, Bayfield is once again fortunate to host the 9th Annual Water 101 Seminar to be held September 25, 2015 at the Bayfield Town Library (395 Bayfield Center Drive) from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm.


July 10, 2015--Justice Gregory Hobbs reflects on water, justice (Colorado Statesman)

“Get a tie. A real tie!” For Coloradans who follow the stylings of Gov. John Hickenlooper, that might sound familiar. But that’s advice Justice Gregory L. Hobbs got the day he was appointed to the Colorado Supreme Court. After almost two decades on the bench, the Supreme Court will lose its most respected expert on water law. Hobbs steps down on Aug.


SAVE THE DATE: September 25th--9th Annual Water 101 Seminar (Bayfield, CO)

Save-the-date for the 9th Annual Water 101 Seminar to be conducted September 25, 2015 in Bayfield. We are again fortunate to have Colorado Supreme Court Justice Greg Hobbs as the keynote speaker. The Seminar qualifies for six continuing education credits for Realtors and seven for lawyers, as well as contact hours for teachers, and .7 training units for water utility personnel. For more information and/or to register contact the WIP at (970) 247-1302.


California Water Rights Exceed Supply

Among other serious water challenges, UC Davis researchers have found that in the last century, California has handed out rights to five times more surface water than their rivers produce even in a normal year. On some major river systems (i.e., the San Joaquin Valley), people have rights to nearly nine times more water than flows from the Sierra mountains.


New Water Rights Transfer

The non-profit Colorado Water Trust and the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) have unveiled a creative new way for agricultural water rights holders to be compensated for sharing their water to meet conservation goals. The two organizations have collaborated to restore late summer flows to a 5-mile stretch of the Little Cimarron River in the Gunnison River Basin by sharing an agricultural water right.


June 24, 2015--ProPublica investigates Colorado River water woes (Public News Service)

The investigative journalism group ProPublica has been taking an in-depth look at the water crisis in the West, in a series that is focused on the Colorado River. As part of the series Killing the Colorado, reporter Abrahm Lustgarten spent months interviewing people on all sides of the water-use debate, from farmers in Arizona to city leaders in Las Vegas. What he said he's l


June 17, 2015--The Colorado River is not a water buffet. So why the 'first come, first serve' policy? (Guardian)

As water shortages grip California and the seven state Colorado River basin, many users feel no pain, while some face a complete curtailment. That’s because the water management system is not designed to be either efficient or equitable but consistent and predictable.


June 11, 2015--Senators vote to repeal Clean Water Rule that protects millions of miles of streams (Climate Progress)

Congressional Republicans are one step closer to blocking the Obama administration’s attempt to clarify the EPA’s regulatory powers under the Clean Water Act. On Wednesday, the Senate Environment and Public Works committee voted 11-9 to pass a bill that would effectively repeal the administration’s recently announced regulations for water pollution.


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