Water Storage

April 24, 2015--Colorado River water shortage: Rural areas would be hit harder than cities (Casa Grande Dispatch)

Arizona’s communities, industries, mines and Native American tribes aren’t likely to be affected during the next five years if federal officials declare a shortage on the Colorado River, officials said Wednesday.


March 11, 2015--Homebuilders’ biggest issues: Water, immigrant labor (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Colorado needs to move quickly on high elevation water storage projects, homebuilders told U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., on Tuesday. New houses need new water taps, Bob Jenkins of the Colorado chapter of the National Homebuilders Association said in a meeting Tuesday with Tipton.


March 10, 2015--Long Hollow reservoir filling (Durango Herald)

Rain and snowmelt runoff have provided the first water for a reservoir on Long Hollow Creek near Redmesa, a long-planned storage unit that will help Colorado meet its contractual water obligation to New Mexico and indirectly provide water for irrigators in the southwest corner of La Plata County. Construction was completed in June 2014 on the Bobby K.


March 8, 2015--Changing the price of water may be the way to beat drought (Deseret News)

Drought across the West and Midwest is driving renewed concerns over water scarcity and the availability to meet demand in the future.


January 30, 2015--Unusually high temperatures, low snow pack could spell trouble for Utah’s water needs (Fox 13)

Five degrees for six months: Those are numbers that cause serious concern for Utah water experts. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist for the National Weather Service, said from August through January, northern Utah has averaged temperatures five degrees higher than normal. “Which is incredibly significant when you talk about snow pack,” McInerney said.


January 30, 2015--Scientists see shrinking California snowpack as a harbinger (Los Angeles Times)

State workers performed a California winter ritual Thursday, poking hollow aluminum tubes into Sierra Nevada meadows to measure the snowpack. In what scientists see as a harbinger, they didn't find much. "We will conceivably see more years like this in the future," said geologist Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.


January 29, 2015--Hickenlooper: Water usage not storage will solve Colorado's shortfall (Denver Post)

The population growth in Colorado and other western states cannot continue unless water supply challenges are met, Gov. John Hickenlooper and state planners said Thursday in opening the Colorado Water Congress annual conference.


December 3, 2014--Mesa Verde ponders mysterious depression (CBS)

Was it a reservoir, a ceremonial plaza, a ball court? Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado is taking a new look at a ruin known as Mummy Lake in hopes of determining how ancient Puebloans used it, The Cortez Journal reported Monday. Archaeologists disagree about the large circular depression lined by sandstone walls.


December 3, 2014--Water at forefront of legislators’ agenda (Montrose Daily Press)

Rural Coloradans need to weigh in once the state’s draft water plan is reviewed and released, Sen. Ellen Roberts told guests of the Montrose Chamber on Tuesday. “Input is critically important.


November 28, 2014--In Wyoming, governor doesn't want to let water leave state (Billings Gazette)

Every spring, John Joyce watches as thousands of gallons of water in the Nowood River rush by his ranch in northern Wyoming. It’s water that eventually moves into the Bighorn, Yellowstone, Missouri and Mississippi rivers before dumping into the Gulf of Mexico.


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