Water Wars

April 12, 2015--The growing potential for water wars (International Policy Digest)

Tensions over water are nothing new and will increase as shortages mount. However, it is possible to avoid violent conflicts over this fundamental resource for human survival provided certain efforts are made to address this pressing challenge.

April 5, 2015--California drought could impact Western Slope (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Even before California declared mandatory water restrictions last week, water purveyors in the Golden State were paying top dollar for water already in the state.

February 25, 2015--Corruption, Climate Could Trigger Water Wars: UN Report (Environmental News Network)

Cleaning up widespread corruption in the water supply industry is crucial to avert looming water conflicts born of desperation, warns a new United Nations report based on case studies in 10 countries.  “In many places … corruption is resulting in the hemorrhaging of precious financial resources,” siphoning an estimated 30 percent of funds earmarked for water and sanitati

January 17, 2015--A brief history of water conflict (Water Online)

As nations face problems ranging from pollution to scarcity, the politics of water resources have become complicated—but that is nothing new. The Pacific Institute, a think tank, has created a 5,000-year timeline of water conflicts, including religious accounts. It shows that water politics have been messy since the beginning.

December 14, 2014--How to avoid injury in a Western water war (Havasu News)

Is the West facing a water war? Facing continued drought, several states are making moves that could threaten interstate compacts and, more importantly, the amount of water flowing into the Colorado River.

November 25, 2014--Water war amid Brazil drought leads to fight over puddles (Bloomberg)

Brazil’s Jaguari reservoir has fallen to its lowest level ever, laying bare measurement posts that jut from exposed earth like a line of dominoes. The nation’s two biggest cities are fighting for what little water is left. Sao Paulo state leaders want to tap Jaguari, which feeds Rio de Janeiro’s main source.

U.S. and Canada Water Wars?

According to a recent Water Online article, the U.S. and Canada could soon be at odds over water. Post Media's Canada.com recently reported: "Canada must prepare for diplomatic water wars with the U.S., as demand on both sides of the border grows for this vital but ultimately limited resource, says Gary Doer, Canadian ambassador to the United States." He said the problem is so pressing that in five years it will make other public debates look "silly." “I think five years from now we will be spending diplomatically a lot of our time and a lot of our work dealing with water,” he said in the report. “There will be pressure on water quality and water quantity.” Canada is rich in water resources--the country controls over 21 percent of the world's supply of fresh water.

October 1, 2014--Preventing water wars: How to build bridges over river disputes (The Guardian)

Fifty years ago, Lake Chad in Africa had a surface area of 25,000 square kilometres. Today, it has less than 2,000. The surface area of the Aral Sea in central Asia has dropped by half, from 66,000 to 33,000 square km, and the Dead Sea in the Middle East from almost 1,000 to 650 square km. Fifty years from now, Lake Chad is at risk of disappearing altogether.

September 26, 2014--Could water scarcity prompt a battle between U.S. and Canada? (Water Online)

Is water so scarce that it could lead to war between the U.S. and Canada over ownership of the valuable substance?

June 20, 2014--Water war bubbling up between California and Arizona (Los Angeles Times)

Once upon a time, California and Arizona went to war over water. The year was 1934, and Arizona was convinced that the construction of Parker Dam on the lower Colorado River was merely a plot to enable California to steal its water rights.

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