Archive - 2015

January 2nd

Telluride: Pandora Water Treatment Plant Up and Running

Twenty years after the Pandora Water Treatment Plant was proposed by local officials concerned about long-term municipal water supply, the facility is up and running, generating clean water. The Pandora Water Treatment Plant valves were opened on October 24th and everything worked, Telluride Public Works Director Paul Ruud said.


West Slope Roundtables Meeting

A West Slope roundtable meeting was conducted in mid-December in Grand Junction. There were about 75 members of the four roundtables, plus another 75 or so members of the public and Colorado’s professional water community, that discussed and heard a number of topics related to the Colorado Water Plan. One of the items on the agenda was the draft seven-point framework developed by the Interbasin Compact Committee (IBCC) that lays out conditions for future discussions on the potential new trans-mountain diversion (TMD) in Colorado. Those seven points include:

Southwest Basin Roundtable Meeting

At their November 12th Southwest Basin Roundtable (SBR) meeting, chair Mike Preston reported the fund balance is $655,916. There was then extensive discussion of the Colorado Water Plan and participants were directed to the draft plan that is now available online on the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) website (www.coloradowaterplan.com). In addition, CWCB staff, Craig Godbout directed members to a document entitled Colorado’s Water Plan: Western Slope Implementation and Themes drafted by James Eklund, CWCB director, and Brent Newman. The document outlines 10 areas of concerns expressed by the Western Slope and how those are addressed in the plan. A summary of those areas are provided on the CWCB website.

Draft Colorado Water Plan Complete!

Rising demand from population growth and industry, if continued through 2050, threatens to leave 2.5 million people in Colorado with a water supply shortfall. Unless solutions are found to meet the gap between water demand and supply, the result could be, among others, agricultural dry-up. Therefore, and in response, in May 2013 Governor Hickenlooper ordered the development of a first-ever Colorado Water Plan. In mid-November the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) sent the Governor a draft of this plan that aims to shape the future of the resource in the state. The plan, which took a year-and-a-half to craft, was a monumental and unprecedented effort that involved the work of hundreds of individuals and organizations throughout Colorado. It is generally agreed that a variety of methods will need to be included in the Plan to meet the water supply needs of the state—conservation, development of already Identified Projects and Processes (IPP’s), agricultural “buy and dry,” and development of “new supply” projects. Taken together, these are referred to as the ‘four legs of the stool.’