Colorado Small Hydro Association

Colorado Agricultural Hydropower Projects

In January the Colorado Small Hydro Association (COSHA), based in Telluride, announced a $1.8 million grant awarded to the Colorado Department of Agriculture by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to support the development of agricultural hydropower projects in the state. The COSHA indicated that the grant will be important in stemming energy costs for area farmers. A COSHA report indicated that Colorado farmers spend an average of $33,000 each year on electricity, mostly to power irrigation pumps. A 2013 analysis by the Colorado Energy Office found that farmers in Colorado report energy expenses around 7 percent of total operating costs. Through the newly established Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP), the USDA is investing $370 million in the implementation of conservation projects in all 50 states. According to COSHA, the new hydro projects won’t result in any new dams or water diversions, but will instead rely on existing untapped water pressure. COSHA estimates 500 new jobs could be created by the new hydro development in Colorado. The new agricultural hydropower program will facilitate the conversion of flood irrigation systems to pressurized irrigation systems with integrated hydropower.


January 18, 2015--Agricultural hydropower projects coming to Colorado (Telluride Daily Planet)

A Telluride hydroelectric advocacy organization announced Thursday a $1.8 million grant awarded to the Colorado Department of Agriculture by the United States Department of Agriculture to support the development of agricultural hydropower projects in the state.


Southwest Colorado Small-Scale Hydro

If you are interested in developing small-scale hydro projects in southwestern Colorado, particularly ditch drops and pressurized irrigation (including center pivots), visit the Colorado Small Hydropower Association website. At a workshop held in Durango on May 19th, it was clear there are many agricultural hydropower opportunities in southwestern Colorado, thanks in part to new federal and state incentives.


May 16, 2014--Curious about small hydro? Check this out (Durango Herald)

The Colorado Small Hydro Association is holding a workshop Monday to brief irrigators about new federal and state regulations that make it easier to install water-driven power plants on agricultural canals.  “There’s definitely a potential to add a hydro system,” Sterling Moss, director of the Natural Resources Conservation Service office in Durango.


Ag Hydropower Workshop (Durango, CO)

05/19/2014 6:30 pm

The Colorado Small Hydro Association will be hosting an Agricultural Hydropower Workshopon Monday, May 19 from 6:30-9:00 p.m. For more information and/or to register contact the Colorado Small Hydro Assn website or Andrea Hart ([email protected], 843 384-4782).


February 21, 2013--House unanimously passes small hydro legislation (Telluride Watch)

The Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act gushed past an important milestone last Wednesday, Feb. 13 when the U.S. House of Representatives approved its passage by a vote of 422-0.The bipartisan legislation seeks to streamline the federal licensing requirements for small hydro projects across the U.S. Local supporters of the bill hailed its passage.

January 24, 2013--House committee again embraces small hydro legislation (Telluride Watch)

A bipartisan bill that seeks to streamline the federal licensing requirements for small hydro projects around the nation got new wings this Tuesday, when the House


July 10, 2012--A big day for small hydro (Telluride Watch)

It may soon be faster, easier and cheaper to implement small hydroelectric projects across the nation, thanks to bipartisan legislation unanimously passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on Monday, July 9. H.R. 5892, also known as the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2012, streamlines the federal licensing requirements for small hydropower projects.


June 15, 2012--Small hydro legislation inches forward (Telluride Watch)

Small hydro advocates across the country are one baby step closer toward their goal of loosening the federal regulatory noose strangling their industry.

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