Cement Creek

August 18, 2015--After the blowout: Silverton faces watershed moment in wake of Gold King Spill (Silverton Standard)

Tucked in amongst towering mountains and surrounded by wilderness with no easy way in or out, Silverton is one of the smallest, highest, most rugged and isolated communities in Colorado. But the three million gallon spill that the Environmental Protection Agency accidentally unleashed from the nearby Gold King Mine into Cement Creek and the Animas River on Aug.


August 6, 2015--River users warned of mine waste (Durango Herald)

Animas River users are being advised to stay off the water today until contaminated water from a mine mishap above Silverton has passed through Durango. The accident occurred about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Gold King Mine in San Juan County.


February 15, 2015--Is Silverton ready for a cleanup? (Durango Herald)

All around Silverton, where a series of mines – once lucrative, now abandoned – pock the earth like gaping, oozing wounds, the waters course with poison. Silverton resident Melody Skinner said her now dead dog Hannah wouldn’t drink water from Cement Creek – which U.S.


September 27, 2014--EPA to plug polluted mine in Silverton (Durango Herald)

Poisonous metals flow from many abandoned mines near Silverton, but in 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency plans to address one that is draining hundreds of gallons of toxins a minute into the watershed.


May 25, 2014--Animas cleanup (Durango Herald)

It may help to clarify some issues regarding the Environmental Protection Agency’s participation with the Animas River Stakeholders Group and that agency’s potential to put Upper Cement Creek on the National Priorities List under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liabilities Act – aka Superfund.


April 22, 2014--Silverton flirting with Superfund? (Durango Herald)

For years, the Environmental Protection Agency has tried to designate parts of Silverton a Superfund site. Yet for years, many locals have considered the word “Superfund” dirtier than Cement Creek. But tonight, the EPA is going to explain that word – and the years-long cleanup process a Superfund designation might entail – to San Juan County commissioners.


November 17, 2012--EPA says metals in Animas a danger to wildlife (Durango Herald)

Concentrations of metals in the upper Animas River and its main tributaries, Cement and Mineral creeks, pose problems for invertebrates, fish and the animals that prey on them, an Environmental Protection Agency study finds. The study is a draft, and the conclusions are conservative, the report says.


September 21, 2012--Study puts higher price on Cement Creek cleanup (Durango Herald)

Building a treatment plant to remove heavy metals from abandoned mines along Cement Creek may cost $6.5 million, and operating it could cost another $910,000 a year, according to a Sunnyside Gold Corp. consultant. Sunnyside Gold Corp.


June 14, 2012--Tipton visits old, leaky mines (Durango Herald)

Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Cortez, toured an old mining area in the San Juan Mountains on Wednesday to familiarize himself with issues involving toxic mine drainage. Tipton spent three hours near Gladstone, now a ghost town, where four abandoned mines are spewing up to 800 gallons a minute of toxic waste into the Cement Creek, a tributary to the Animas River.


Sunnyside Offers $6.5M for Mine Cleanup

According to a Durango Herald article, the largest gold producer ever in Silverton, Sunnyside Gold Corporation, has offered $6.5 million toward cleaning up toxic waste leaking from one of its mines.


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