Toilets

New Toilet Turns Waste into Electricity and Fertilizer

According to a recent Science Daily article, researchers have invented a new toilet system that turns human waste into electricity and fertilizers. It also reduces the amount of water needed for flushing by up to 90 percent compared to current toilet systems. Dubbed the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet, it has two chambers that separate the liquid and solid wastes.


October 1, 2012--CU-Boulder says graywater system could save 800,000 gallons a year (Boulder Daily)

Starting next year, treated wastewater from showers and sinks could be used to flush toilets in Williams Village North, the University of Colorado's green-certified dorm.


August 15, 2012--CU-Boulder team wins grant to reinvent toilet (Aurora Sentinel)

A team of student and faculty engineers from the University of Colorado Boulder is among the winners of grants from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to reinvent the toilet. The foundation has a competition to invent a waterless, hygienic, safe, affordable toilet for the 2.5 billion people worldwide who don’t have access to modern sanitation.


June 26, 2012--New toilet turns human waste into electricity and fertilizer (Science Daily)

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have invented a new toilet system that will turn human waste into electricity and fertilisers and also reduce the amount of water needed for flushing by up to 90 per cent compared to current toilet systems in Singapore. Dubbed the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet, it has two chambers that separate the liquid and solid wastes.


October 19, 2011--Water committee flushes toilet measures (Durango Herald)

Bipartisanship stops at the bathroom door for legislators on a special water committee. The panel shot down two bills Tuesday that sought water savings from toilets.


September 9, 2011--Lawmakers consider water restrictions (Pueblo Chieftain)

Colorado isn’t exactly flush with water, so to conserve some, Denver Water on Thursday asked the General Assembly to impose restrictions on toilet and urinal flows.


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